Proof: the symmetry group of a complete graph is vertex transitive

The following self-contained post relates to definition 1.17, p. 11, of the book “Groups, graphs and trees: an introduction to the geometry of infinite groups” by John H. Meier.

Let K_n be a complete graph and \mbox{Sym}(K_n) its symmetry group. It will be shown that K_n is vertex transitive, i.e. that for any two vertices v_i\in K_n and v_j\in K_n there exists a symmetry a\in\mbox{Sym}(K_n) such that a(v_i)=v_j.

The proof is constructive. Given any two vertices v_i\in K_n and v_j\in K_n, it suffices to provide a symmetry a_{ij}:V(\Gamma)\bigcup E(\Gamma)\rightarrow V(\Gamma)\bigcup E(\Gamma)\in\mbox{Sym}(K_n) such that a_{ij}(v_i)=v_j. Although the suggested symmetry is different for every v_i and v_j, the simpler notation a is preferred in place of a_{ij}.

Given v_i\in K_n and v_j\in K_n, a suitable symmetry can be constructed by swapping v_i with v_j, by redirecting all edges with one end in v_i to edges with one end in v_j and vice versa, and by leaving all other vertices and edges intact.

To formalize the construction, given v_i\in K_n and v_j\in K_n, the symmetry a is set to satisfy the following seven properties:

  • a(v_i)=v_j,
  • a(v_j)=v_i,
  • a(v_k)=v_k for all vertices v_k other than v_i,~v_j,
  • a(e_{ij})=e_{ij}, where e_{ij} denotes the edge connecting v_i with v_j,
  • a(e_{ik})=e_{jk} for all k other than i,~j, where e_{ik} denotes the edge connecting v_i with v_k and e_{jk} the edge connecting v_j with v_k,
  • a(e_{jk})=e_{ik} for all k other than i,~j, and
  • a(e_{kl})=e_{kl} for all k,~l other than i,~j, where e_{kl} denotes the edge connecting v_k with v_l.

Note that all edges exist in the above construction since K_n is complete, so the symmetry is well-defined.

It is easy to check that the proposed symmetry maps vertices to vertices, edges to edges, and preserves the connectivity of \Gamma according to the definition of symmetry provided in this blog post. For instance, \mbox{ends}(e_{ik})=\{v_i,v_k\}, a(e_{ik})=e_{jk}, a(v_i)=v_j and a(v_k)=v_k yield \mbox{ends}(a(e_{ik}))=\mbox{ends}(e_{jk})=\{v_j,v_k\}=\{a(v_i),a(v_k)\}, which is an edge in K_n.

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